It is due to the fact that digital cameras, like those smartphones have, do not capture the whole image in a single instant. Instead, they scan from one corner to the opposite one.

Scanning obviously takes place in a very short period of time, but if something in the frame moves at a faster pace than the scan, the camera picks it up at different times, and brings them all back together in the photo.

Below, some examples:

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The photo does not include many other organs, such as the heart ($119,000), egg cells (up to $50,000), coronary artery ($1,525), small intestine ($2,520), the skull and teeth ($1,200), the spleen ($508), the scalp ($600), the gallbladder ($1,200), the stomach ($500), the shoulder ($500) and hair (several hundred dollars).

Taking a short account, just because you are a healthy person, you are worth at least $850,000. Not to mention the value of the skin, blood and eggs.

And you keep making more of some of these things constantly.

Realistically, a healthy human being is worth at least a million dollars and more.

All this makes me realize how the idea of cloning people to get “spare parts”, like in the movie “The island”, is actually very profitable.

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Some areas not only in Scotland, but also in Japan and other countries, have decided to replace common lighting with blue night lights.

The areas in question have seen a decrease in the number of suicides by 84%, and in miscellaneous crimes by 9%.

Blue lights, being cold lights, have an antidepressant effect similar to that of sunlight.

In Japan, it is mainly train stations and bridges (for obvious reasons) that are illuminated in this way.

Blue lights are also often used in club bathrooms to prevent you from using heroin. In fact, it seems that with this type of light it is more difficult to see the veins in the arm and therefore to inject substances.

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Giuseppe Frisella

Giuseppe Frisella

I'm a curious person and I'm on Medium mainly to read and share thoughts and knowledge. I love science, especially physics and evolutionary biology.